STILL LIFE

Posted 13th May 2016.

Written by Noel Coward.

Directed by Tony Kingston.

Performed 18th to 21st November 2004

at the Château de Bettembourg, Luxembourg.

A New World Theatre Club production.

Still Life is the study of a passionate love affair between Alec and Laura, two happily married people who meet by chance at a railway station. Their struggle between their love for each other and their duty to their other lives is beautifully drawn and painfully real and has made both the play and the film one of Coward’s best-loved pieces as well as being one of the writer’s personal favourites.

Sir Noel Coward was one of the most prolific and influential British playwrights of the 20th century. Plays like Hay Fever (1925), Private Lives (1930) and Blithe Spirit (1940) and his most famous song “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” demonstrate his talent for fast and witty dialogue. However he could also cast a serious and reflective eye on human strengths and weaknesses. Still Life which, together with the light comedy Hands across the Sea, superbly demonstrate both the comic and serious sides of Coward’s work.

HANDS ACROSS THE SEA

Posted 29th April 2016.

Written by Noel Coward.

Directed by Tony Kingston.

Performed 18th to 21st November 2004

at the Château de Bettembourg, Luxembourg.

A New World Theatre Club production.

Hands Across the Sea is a drawing-room comedy in which the wrong guests arrive at an impromptu cocktail party causing confusion, chaos and crossed conversations.

SHOWTIME

Posted 29th April 2016.

Directed by Dominique Vitali.

Musical direction by Philip Dutton.

Performed 27th to 29th October 2004

at the Théâtre Municipal, Esch-sur-Alzette.

A Pirate Productions production.

Total madness. Everything over ran. Set building up to the last-minute, directorial changes during tech and a reluctant theatre crew made this a tense challenge. The end result, however, was a fantastic celebration of musical theatre.

WINE AND SONG

Posted 29th April 2016.

Directed by Rachel Parker.

Musical direction by Liz Turner and Jackie Fleming.

Performed during the summer in 2004

at Gasperich Parish Hall.

A Pirate Productions production.

The first in the “Wine and…” series. Consisting of an evening of wine tasting accompanied by, on this occassion, some of our favourite songs.

Excellent fun!

FOOTPRINTS IN THE SAND

Posted 13th May 2016.

Written by Colin Crowther.

Directed by Wendy Dunning.

Performed 5th to 8th May 2004

at Gasperich Parish Hall, Luxembourg

and 29th May 2004

at the Arenbergschouwberg, Antwerp

and 31st July 2004

at the Albert Hall, Llandrindod Wells.

A New World Theatre Club production for FEATS.

Best Production.

Best Stage Presentation.

Best Actress – Jan Horsburgh.

A psychological drama based on the Welsh saint Dwynwen who lived in the fifth century. This play is about the ability of people in extreme situations, in any age or place, to find the courage to transform their suffering. Our production had a strong hint of the surreal with a set drawing inspiration from Salvador Dali.

Congratulations to the cast and crew of “Footprints in the Sand”, which took top honors at this year’s amateur theatre festival in Antwerp!

At the final evening’s awards ceremony our NWTC team won for Best Production, Best Stage Presentation and Best Actress (Jan Horsburgh), as well as a nominee for Best Actor (Adrian Diffey). In fact, such a large number of awards has only been won once before in 1980 by the Kent Players of Germany.

We knew we had a winner at the Saturday evening début of Footprints–it was the first play of the festival to receive applause for the set as the curtains opened. The cast gave their best performance to date, and to see this production in a professional theatre with the special lighting and staging as intended was absolutely stunning! In the final moment of the play (the tableaux in silhouette) the audience literally gasped at the effect created. Of course, my comments are admittedly prejudiced.

Cast: Adrian Diffey, Jan Horsburgh, Kendra Horsburgh, Alison Kelly.

Director: Wendy Dunning.

Stage Manager: Pauline Lloyd.

Lighting Man Extraordinaire: Anthony McCarthy.

Set Designer and Master Shell Creator: Malcolm Turner.

Oceans Eleven and Seagull Sound Engineer: Adam Mitchell.

Make-up Magician: Pat Chambers.

Fast on Their Feet Duo: Angela Milne and Pete Mitchell.

And all of those creative Sea Goddesses whose shells may cross the Channel: Diana Button, Bobbie Khan, and Fran Potasnik.

(Above comments by Deborah Anderson on attending Feats for the first time)

The New World Theatre Club Luxembourg (Director Wendy Dunning-Baker) gave the final performance of the 2004 NDFA British All Winners Festival.
FOOTPRINTS IN THE SAND is written by Colin Crowther and is a psychological drama, based on the Welsh saint Dwynwen who lived in the 5th century. It focuses on the ability of people in extreme situations, in any age of place, to find the courage to transform their suffering. Scott found this to be “a most unusual and very remarkable play, seamlessly wedding past and present and looking to the future. It is about grace, love, faith and hope.” A man is brought back from the abyss of despair by an abiding love. The surreal setting gave warning of what was to come, with the characters of the 5th century coming into the 21st century. The adjudicator praised the “absolute professionalism in the visual presentation of the play”, but added that the earlier moments would have benefited from a “marginal increase in the intensity of light”, in order to see the characters’ faces. There were some moments of “delightful direction”, particularly when Nana and the man shared speeches about their illness. This was “artistic, intelligent work, not flawless, but with very much to admire in the acting, lighting, sound and direction.”

A SEPERATE PEACE

Posted 13th May 2016

A television play by Tom Stoppard.

Directed by Tony Kingston.

Performed 5th to 8th May 2004

at Gasperich Parish Hall, Luxembourg.

A New World Theatre Club production.

A Separate Peace was originally written for television in 1965 and is a light, enigmatic comedy set in a private nursing home. The smooth running of the home and the peace of mind of its staff is disrupted by the arrival of a patient, John Brown. He is warm, charming and can easily pay for his room … the only problem is that he is perfectly healthy. All he wants is to get away from the outside world. The play follows the desperate, often comic, attempts of the nursing staff to crack the riddle of Brown’s disarming honesty. However, behind the humour, Stoppard poses a key question about the way our society works: why do we feel so uncomfortable about people who want to do nothing – even when they can afford it?

DINOSAURS AND ALL THAT RUBBISH

Posted 14th May 2016.

Written and directed by Chas Warlow.

Performed May 2004

somewhere in Luxembourg City.

A Creative Workshop production.

A musical play was organised for children: Dinosaurs and all that Rubbish. It was a ‘roaring’ success!

I think this was at one of the smaller buildings on the Forum Campus Geesseknäppchen but I do remember being told NOT to touch the lights!